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kevinreader:

theincandescentqueen:

kevinreader:

The Major Arcana - Potential layout design

Now that I have completed the base sigil designs for the Major Arcana for my Tarot deck I am looking to place them into the correct format for printing. Attached is just one of the potential layout design that I am testing out.

Thoughts and suggestions are most welcome!

Feel free to watch the progress from concept to completion here.

These are so gorgeous, and the concept is so unique for a deck! They remind me of transmutation circles. I hope this is going to be available for purchase some day? o:

Interesting question…

With the deck only two card away from completion what would you expect to pay for a complete set of these cards?

I’m considering having a limited number of decks made up.

Feel free to send a message to my inbox if your interested.

I don’t really know how to express my feelings about this, so:

(Would you consider using The Game Crafter - or a similar service - to get the decks printed on demand, rather than making it a limited edition?)

bobbycaputo:

Real People Remake the Major Arcana Cards of the Tarot Deck

Dating back to the mid-15th century and still used today, tarot cards began as a card game and progressed to map mental and spiritual pathways for mystics and psychics. The Major Arcana (trump cards) are based on “elite ideology in the Italian courts of the 15th century,” which many modern mystics are unfamiliar with. In this fun project by Giulia Pex these cards are revisited, as real people reveal the personalities of each character. In her signature photography/illustration combo, she re-imagines the major arcana cards.

(Continue Reading)

Anonymous
asks:
Did the ancient hellens practice magick? Is it ok to practice magick as a hellenic polytheist? If so, is it then better to keep the Theoi out of the practice even though it involves their relms for example Poseidon and sea magic or Demeter and earth magic. Why is this a taboo subject in Hellenismos but not in Asatru for example. The Nordic people saw their Gods as the source of magic. Is this opossed to our ideas of the nature of the Theoi? Yet again we can never know their true nature.

baringtheaegis:

I am of the rather strong opinion that modern witchcraft has no place in Hellenismos—especially when that witchcraft is defined as acts which allow humanity influence over their lives and those of others, outside of the realm of the Gods. I call anything else ‘praying’, and if you need tools for that, than I take no issue besides the fact that it’s non-Traditional—save for when it is.

Something I often hear about the ancient Hellenic religion, and prescribed about its modern equivalent, is that there was no magic in ancient Hellas. This is true. It’s also a lie. It all depends on your definition of magic, and for the purpose of this reply, we are going to see magic as a form of prayer and ritual, conducted outside of the usual ritual steps. The Theoi were always invoked, but for magic, the sacrifices were usually to the khthonic, or Underworld Gods. When reading this post about a very specific subset of this type of magic, try to disassociate it with the modern use of the word: the same goes for ‘spells’, ‘cursing’, and ‘binding’.

The ancient Hellenes were a competitive people, and struggled with many of the issues we do today: the urge to perform well, the desire for justice to be served, and a need for love. Prayers for these things were made often, usually in their normal ritualized form at the house altar. If these requests were made against, or at the expense of another person, however, they were generally taken out of the realm of regular worship and kharis, and into the realm of the khthonic. The preferred form were katadesmoi.

Katadesmoi are relatively small tablets, inscribed with a desire asked of the Theoi to fulfil. The Katadesmoi that have survived were generally made out of very thin sheets of lead, which were then rolled, folded or pierced with nails. Wax, papyrus, stone, precious metals, and precious minerals would also have been used as a medium. Some katadesmoi were accompanied by a small doll representing the intended victim or even a lock of their hair, especially in the case of love spells. In general, the katadesmoi always included the name of the intended victim and the name(s) of the appropriated Gods—most often Hades, Kharon, Hekate, and Persephone. Exceptions have been found, of course.

There have been around 1600 katadesmoi found around the whole of Hellas, and the practice was wide-spread. In fact, for the Olympic Games, competitors had to vow to Olympian Zeus that they would not cheat, and curse their opponents. Divine retribution would befall those competitors who did. A large percentage of the katadesmoi found contained love spells (“I want [name] to love me beyond all others”), or legal desires (“May [name] stumble on his words in defence of himself”), but many other ill wishes have been found.

Katadesmoi were usually deposited where they would be closest to the Underworld: in chasms, pools of water, wells, caves, temples to the deity in question, buried underground, or placed in graves. The latter was usually a special form, however, and the katadesmoi placed with the dead were usually requests to avenge the death of the deceased.

In general, katadesmoi were used out of desperation: regular channels had been exhausted, human courts would never convict the perpetrator of a crime, or the murderer could not be found. Pleading with the Gods—who knew more, saw more, and had a much farther reach—was considered the only alternative to get justice. This was even the case in many love spells. Katadesmoi were not made willy-nilly: there needed to be a strong incentive to make one.

One other such incentive was the fear that a katadesmos curse had been placed upon you. In this case, the subject of the curse could make their own, and ask that the perpetrator of the katadesmos may suffer for it, and that his or her katadesmos may have no effect at all, except maybe to backfire on them. In this case, the katadesmos acts as a binding curse.

There is magic in the Classics as well; the most famous witch in Hellenic mythology is undoubtedly Kirkê (Κιρκη)—better known by her Roman name, Circe. She is the woman whom Odysseus comes upon on the island Aiaia, who turns his men into pigs, and keeps Odysseus with her—and in her bed, no less—for a year before she helps him get back to his quest to return home. The account of Kirkê is one of the founding myths for the modern witch stereotype: she is the evil temptress, free with her sexuality, and freer with the magic that women possess by nature. She seduces Odysseus while beguiling his men, transforming them into docile animals—de-humanizing them, and stripping them of their masculinity. In the end, Odysseus overcomes her, and leaves, outside of her grasp forever. At least, that is the modern interpretation of her character.

Kirkê, in the time of Hómēros was not evil at all, yet she was dangerous. Kirkê, when looked at through the lens of ancient Hellenic society, is Odysseus’ superior by far. It may seem a bit off-topic to go into this, but I must to make my point. Kirkê is the daughter of the Sun God Helios—which makes her a Goddess in her own right, but a more accurate term would be ‘Nymph’, putting her in control of nature. Her pedigree—by default—means that Odysseus can never master her, as Odysseus may be the favourite of the Gods, but he is not divine himself.

So, what of her magic? Kirkê is a Goddess whose powers manifest through herbs; what she does to men is not much different as many other—more powerful—Gods do unto humans as well with just a thought; Hellenic mythology is full of humans who get turned into animals (or plants) for their protection, or for the protection of the God in question. It’s important to note that in the Odysseia, Kirkê’s ‘victims’ are happy and domesticated; they are friendly and curious to visitors and Kirkê alike.

Kirkê’s status over Odysseus takes her away from being a witch in the modern sense; she is a Goddess, and as someone lower in standing, Odysseus’ wishes are something she can take into advisement but only needs to agree upon out of a sense of honour, not because her magical hold over him has broken. She never controls Odysseus—the moly potion/herb Odysseus is given establishes that—and they work out an agreement where they are on roughly equal footing, with Kirkê forever having the upper hand, but bound by her personal honour and oath to Odysseus. Her magic—her divinity—is made a moot point between them.

The Odysseia gives plenty of reasons why the words ‘witch’ and ‘witchcraft’ are dangerous for modern interpretation. These powers—and those that use them—are established as divine, taking these powers fully outside of the realm of humanity. Yes, there was ‘magic’ and ‘witchcraft’ in ancient Hellas and its mythology, but not in the way we know it now; this was divine magic; a manifestation of a trait major Gods manifest with a thought. These lesser deities require a medium to manifest their powers—especially in the case of Kirkê—but their powers are still the powers of a God. This is exactly why I feel we, as Hellenists, should pray to the Gods for any aid we might require, and blessings we would wish upon our lives; to practice magic ourselves would be to equate ourselves with the (minor) Gods, and Hellenismos is clear upon the status of humans: we are human, not divine. To practice magic is to practice hubris, and that is decidedly dangerous in a Hellenistic context.

Again, I want to stress that this concerns Traditional Hellenismos—as everything on this blog does. That is my practice, and it is what I understand best. If you want to practice magic; go for it. Who am I to tell you can or cannot do something? As for Asatru; it’s hard—and in my opinion useless—to compare ancient cultures like this. The people were different, the thoughts about the divine were different, and unless you are a soft polytheist who conflates all Gods and Goddesses, lumping them and their culture together is detrimental to all Gods in question. Again, my opinion. Magic is a touchy subject in Hellenismos because it borders on hubris, and as a Traditional Hellenist I find myself shying away from everything that could possibly induce hubris and damage my kharis with the Gods. I gave up my magical practice—as sporadic as it was—once I progressed into Hellenismos. It’s a personal choice, but one that was very clear for me. How you decide is up to you.

thejoemoose:

carpeumbra:

thejoemoose:

carpeumbra:

ricknielsen:

roger—-waters:

Girls protesting for mini skirts, 1960s


Dior Unfair To MiniSkirts???

Apparently, the miniskirt was a symbol of feminism in the 1960’s.
http://www.randomhistory.com/2009/05/25_miniskirt.html

But why is Dior unfair to them. Did Dior not use mini skirts in the spring collection or what’s going on

During the 50’s and 60’s, Dior fashioned “The New Look”, which emphasized long hemlines and more feminine clothing. And, of course, the teenagers at the time, impressed with ideas of individual expression, thought that the trend was irrelevant to them.

What’s odd is that “Dior” is plastered over another name, possibly “Chanel”, who actually dismissed mini skirts as being “just awful”. Why the change of heart?

thejoemoose:

carpeumbra:

thejoemoose:

carpeumbra:

ricknielsen:

roger—-waters:

Girls protesting for mini skirts, 1960s

Dior Unfair To MiniSkirts???

Apparently, the miniskirt was a symbol of feminism in the 1960’s.

http://www.randomhistory.com/2009/05/25_miniskirt.html

But why is Dior unfair to them. Did Dior not use mini skirts in the spring collection or what’s going on

During the 50’s and 60’s, Dior fashioned “The New Look”, which emphasized long hemlines and more feminine clothing. And, of course, the teenagers at the time, impressed with ideas of individual expression, thought that the trend was irrelevant to them.

What’s odd is that “Dior” is plastered over another name, possibly “Chanel”, who actually dismissed mini skirts as being “just awful”. Why the change of heart?

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

hazelhaegtesse:

image

Bit of that piece I’m working on that’s taking effin’ forever

the… pain…

whyyyyy…

why yu must hurted me?

lisafrideborg:

I put together a list of 30 picture challenges for divination. The hashtag/tag to use if you are interested in participating on your blog, instagram, tumblr, G+ or FB is #30daydivinationpic
Feel free to use your imagination about how to interpret these challenges. I look forward to seeing a lot of variety and unique image ideas. Please comment below with alink to your blog if you plan on blogging this challenge so that we can follow along!
1. Selfie with your Tarot Soul Card2. Your name in runes (draw it if you don’t have any runes)3. A crystal ball (use a public domain image and jazz it up if you don’t have your own)4. A pendulum (make your own from a ring if you don’t have one)5. Your favourite Lenormand deck/card6. The palm of your hand7. Cards (Tarot, Oracle, Lennies, Playing Cards) and a Cup of Tea (or coffee)8. Candle with any divination tool9. A hand drawn self-made Tarot Spread10. A Tarot quote collage11. Moss12. Crystals on their own or with another divination tool13. Death14. Rainbow colours15. Chains16. Feathers17. Flowers18. On the rocks19. Your favourite card backs20. Your favourite Tarot bag21. A piece of jewellery you like to wear for divination22. Your Spirit Animal Guide23. The number 924. Priest/ess (go wild and stage a pic of you as a Priest/ess of an Ancient Temple if you like!)25. Faeries – in the cards, figurines, you dressed out… whatever26. Love hearts (any divination tool – think Valentine’s reading)27. Swords (doesn’t have to be Tarot)28. Glitter and Stars29. A card or rune over your heart (something you desire to manifest)30. Selfie with a divination symbol who represents how you feel

Maybe I’ll get further than #1 with this one…

lisafrideborg:

I put together a list of 30 picture challenges for divination. The hashtag/tag to use if you are interested in participating on your blog, instagram, tumblr, G+ or FB is #30daydivinationpic

Feel free to use your imagination about how to interpret these challenges. I look forward to seeing a lot of variety and unique image ideas. Please comment below with alink to your blog if you plan on blogging this challenge so that we can follow along!

1. Selfie with your Tarot Soul Card
2. Your name in runes (draw it if you don’t have any runes)
3. A crystal ball (use a public domain image and jazz it up if you don’t have your own)
4. A pendulum (make your own from a ring if you don’t have one)
5. Your favourite Lenormand deck/card
6. The palm of your hand
7. Cards (Tarot, Oracle, Lennies, Playing Cards) and a Cup of Tea (or coffee)
8. Candle with any divination tool
9. A hand drawn self-made Tarot Spread
10. A Tarot quote collage
11. Moss
12. Crystals on their own or with another divination tool
13. Death
14. Rainbow colours
15. Chains
16. Feathers
17. Flowers
18. On the rocks
19. Your favourite card backs
20. Your favourite Tarot bag
21. A piece of jewellery you like to wear for divination
22. Your Spirit Animal Guide
23. The number 9
24. Priest/ess (go wild and stage a pic of you as a Priest/ess of an Ancient Temple if you like!)
25. Faeries – in the cards, figurines, you dressed out… whatever
26. Love hearts (any divination tool – think Valentine’s reading)
27. Swords (doesn’t have to be Tarot)
28. Glitter and Stars
29. A card or rune over your heart (something you desire to manifest)
30. Selfie with a divination symbol who represents how you feel

Maybe I’ll get further than #1 with this one…

ancientart:

Bronze statuette of a veiled and masked dancer. Greek, 3rd–2nd century B.C.

The complex motion of this dancer is conveyed exclusively through the interaction of the body with several layers of dress.

Over an undergarment that falls in deep folds and trails heavily, the figure wears a lightweight mantle, drawn tautly over her head and body by the pressure applied to it by her right arm, left hand, and right leg. Its substance is conveyed by the alternation of the tubular folds pushing through from below and the freely curling softness of the fringe.The woman’s face is covered by the sheerest of veils, discernible at its edge below her hairline and at the cutouts for the eyes. Her extended right foot shows a laced slipper. This dancer has been convincingly identified as one of the professional entertainers, a combination of mime and dancer, for which the cosmopolitan city of Alexandria was famous in antiquity. (MET)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections1972.118.95.

Time to reblog one of my favourite sculptures again! 

hellboundwitch:

I was reading a book, and this time actually NOT to break it apart for spreads — but apparently that didn’t stop me. I literally had to put the book down and walk away so I could go write this down.

[Tarot Illuminati]

[1] Your VICE - PcC

[2] Why you LIKE it - 4C

[3] What it’s REALLY DOING to you - 6W

[4] How you should DEAL with it - 5W

[Quint] 15 - The Devil

ahahahAHAHAHAHAAAAAAAaaa… /FUCK YOU/

I see a lot of familiar faces here. Gotta love the Fire vs Water dynamic *I have no idea what you’re referring to*

Good spread, hellboundwitch. Think I might do a Virtue one as well.

oeuniverse:

In order to become the supreme adult, you must perform the seven wonders:

  • Public speaking
  • Not being afraid of teenagers
  • Calling the doctor yourself
  • Taxes
  • Arguing without crying
  • Having a normal sleep pattern
  • Having an answer to the question ‘what do you want to do with your life?’

2 out of 7

Possibly 2.5

Mirror, mirror on the wall,

Who’s the most M̖̩͓̣̹̣E͔̼̟͎͈͓̙͝T̯͎̩A̢͎͚͕͓̠̻̥L̬̙̤ ͙̖M̦O̷͔̺L̢̹̜̠̪̪ͅL̘͖̙U̲S̵̟͎͖C͎ of them all?

sh8-bit-angora:

needthisbook:

Ten Major Artists:

Wong Wong & Lulu

Pepper examining himself before commencing a self-portrait

Pepper’s self-portrait

Tiger the spontaneous reductionist

Misty goes off the wall

Minnie, the abstract expressionist

Minnie’s Reindeer in Provence, 1992.

Smokey painting after an hour in the catnip patch

Smokey at work

Ginger’s Stripped Bare Birds, 1992.

Princess, the elemental fragmentist

Charlie, the peripheral realist

this literally makes me so happy

y o u   k n o w   w h o   y o u   a r e

sh8-bit-angora:

needthisbook:

Ten Major Artists:

Wong Wong & Lu Lu

Wong Wong & Lulu

Pepper gazing into the mirror before a self-portrait

Pepper examining himself before commencing a self-portrait

Pepper painting his self-portrait

Pepper’s self-portrait

Tiger

Tiger the spontaneous reductionist

Misty in action

Misty goes off the wall

Minnie: abstract expressionist

Minnie, the abstract expressionist

Minnies finished work

Minnie’s Reindeer in Provence, 1992.

Smokey contemplating

Smokey painting after an hour in the catnip patch

Smokey painting after an hour in the catnip patch

Smokey at work

Ginger's 'Stripped Bare Birds', 1992.

Ginger’s Stripped Bare Birds, 1992.

Princess' 'Regularly Ridiculed Rodents', 1993.

Princess, the elemental fragmentist

Charlie the peripheral realist

Charlie, the peripheral realist

this literally makes me so happy

y o u   k n o w   w h o   y o u   a r e

that being said…

hellboundwitch:

who do I have to blow to get books written for the Manga Tarot? The Fairy Lights? THE MONA LISA?? (That one was SUPPOSED to have a book, right?)

WE DON OT SPEAK OF TH MONA LISA BOOK

carpeumbra:

My essay. I expect hate mail in the morning

Read More

ofools:

i regret nothing about this self portrait because its still so fucking awfulesome and funny

THERE I FIXED IT